Ärzte ohne Grenzen http://deutschpillen.com/erektile-dysfunktion/spedra-100/ 2-Tages-Diät-Pille

It was about four weeks ago when Dave, a good friend of mine from Portland called me from downtown Chicago asking if he, along with the four members of Capybara (Mark Harrison, Darin Seal, Joel Wrolstad, and Jared Horne) and their tour manager, Liz could stay in my apartment for five days once they arrived in Seattle. Capybara are currently in the midst of a forty-four city tour across the U.S. and Seattle would be their halfway point. Six people in my two bedroom apartment for five days. Never one to pass up an opportunity to meet new people and help out starving artists who play amazing music, I was more than happy to oblige.


A couple weeks and only one wrong turn in the U-District later, Dave piloted Capybara’s airliner-on-wheels to my place of work to pick up the key to my apartment for the remaining few hours of my work day. There’s nothing like coming home at 11:00 p.m. after a fifteen hour work day, greeted by seven happy people sitting around your living room, all ready to head over to Jabu’s Pub for a few pitchers of PBR. And we did just that, right before heading over to Kerry Park to check out the amazing view of downtown Seattle at 1 a.m. Back at my apartment, we pulled out the hide-a-bed, piled Therm-a-Rests and blankets on the floor, and within minutes everyone was lulled to sleep by the whir of the fan on Capybara’s fancy-shmancy plug-in tour cooler.

 
Capybara formed as a band just over nine months ago in January, all four members trading in their day jobs for a gigantic Ford van and the freedom of the open road. At the time of this writing and halfway through their tour, I’m rather sure they still don’t have t-shirts made. No merch to sell, no jobs, and giving CDs away at shows for next to nothing (or sometimes completely nothing) basically amounts to no money for the band. And driving a van across the country, setting up (and playing) shows nearly every single night, finding places to stay, and keeping the tour cooler stocked with peanut butter, milk, and cereal are all things that cost money and require plenty of time and energy.

 
The day following Capybara’s arrival, as I slaved away at work, I envisioned Mark, Joel, and Darin (Jared was still back in Missouri, loading up on fresh baked cookies from his mom – thanks, Jared’s mom!) all frolicking about in the streets of Seattle, partaking in all of the greatest tourist activities the city has to offer and eating expensive food at lavish restaurants downtown. After all, that’s what tour is all about, right? Turns out, these guys are just like most other artists I know: They spend more time working than actually showing what they’ve worked so hard for – or even receiving much recognition for it.

 
This is especially true for Capybara, who have been utilizing a DIY (or as the guys in Capybara put it, Try It Yourself), “book-as-you-go” method for finding venues to play on their tour. Most of their day Saturday was spent sitting at coffee shops on computers contacting local venues to book future shows or making posters and flyers to promote the two shows that would be happening over the next two days. Booking their own shows has often caused things to happen last minute, resulting in crowds that range in numbers of anywhere from six to sixty people. And that’s if they even play in an actual venue; as I sat down to type this story, Capybara were in the process of renting a U-Haul and a generator for the purpose of having their own mobile stage in the event that they weren’t able to book a show in Portland.

 
I was actually fortunate enough to attend both of Capybara’s free shows here in Washington; the first at Le Voyeur in Olympia and the other at Bop Street Records in Ballard. Both shows were based on their debut album, Try Brother, but included a ton of new, unrecorded material as well.

 
Although the Olympia show was more eventful with its pre-show vaudeville act in some shady downtown parking lot, its numerous drunken homeless men in attendance, and a much higher rate of consumption of Chinese snake and ginseng-infused rice vodka, both shows were equally as compelling in content and performance despite the small audiences. When Capybara took the stage, it seemed as though their whole idea was to have as much fun as possible and play the best music they could. And they did both. Very well.

Snake/ginseng vodka @ Le Voyeur

Snake/ginseng vodka @ Le Voyeur

 

Capybara @ Le Voyeur

Capybara @ Le Voyeur

 

Watching Capybara play, it’s not difficult to see where the results of their sacrifices and hard work come through in their music. Capybara’s live performance is a strategically choreographed, percussion-laden and electronic-accented adventure in mellow, yet energetic indie rock tracks connected together by samples of dialogue from the movie Contact that will leave you listening – and more than likely dancing – with complete happiness. That’s really the best way I can describe it. Their music is uplifting in a number of ways, but also has a reflective quality that allows you to be completely mindful of the music as it takes you to a completely different level of your mind. Throughout the set, Mark, Joel, Jared, and Darin rotate through instruments so often that it becomes difficult to keep track of “who just played what on that last song”.

Capybara’s vocals are a transcendent arrangement of multiple, if not all band members singing at once, but that changes from song to song in the same way that Mark would play the melodica for one song, and later be picking the bass line on “Birthday Song For A Bridgegirl” with a nostalgic eminence that one can’t help but smile at. Joel appeared equally as comfortable striking the pads of the MalletKAT (yes, I had to Google that) as he did on the keyboard singing the lyrics to one of Capybara’s new songs (so new that it has yet to be recorded or even given a title). Jared played his classical guitar with such intense precision and focus that I’m not sure he even opened his eyes through the entire set. And he hit every note. I recently saw a band play whose keyboardist played with the heel of her foot and some part of her face, as well. But that was just the keyboard. There was a point in Capybara’s set where Darin – in a blurred frenzy of dirty blonde hair and shouting vocals, bass guitar slung over his shoulder and right hand cuing samples and turning knobs on the mixer – nailed every intended note on the keyboard with precise control of his left hand.

Darin and Jared @ Le Voyeur

Darin and Jared @ Le Voyeur

 

Joel @ Le Voyeur

Joel @ Le Voyeur

 

Mark, helping out the homeless @ Le Voyeur

Mark, helping out the homeless @ Le Voyeur

 

The contagious fun these four friends exhibit while on stage is not only something earned by their hard work, but something that only comes from the minds of artists who truly understand what it takes to make beautiful music. The band has an apparent familiarity with the concept of not taking life too seriously while also doing everything it takes to reach their goals. Their music moves in a way that can most certainly be heard, but can also be felt as it pulls you in to regions of your mind that you tend not to travel very often.

 

capybara7

 

If you have a chance to catch Capybara on the 2nd half of their tour, you can bet that the show will either be free to attend or pretty damn close. If they call you asking for a place to sleep for a few days and you let them, there’s a pretty good likelihood they’ll bring cookies to share with you. And Joel may even serenade you on the balcony outside your apartment if you have a guitar lying around (and a balcony). Free shows, incredible music, snake vodka, and delicious cookies… did I mention their music? Don’t miss it. They’re debut album is called Try Brother and it is available for download in its entirety at http://www.capybaramusic.com/

Capybara – Birthday Song For a Bridgegirl (footage from Taos, New Mexico):

taosybara from mark harrison on Vimeo.

Capybara – Radio performance of The Wimp on KCOU 88.1 FM:

CAPYBARA / The Wimp / Radio Performance from mark harrison on Vimeo.

Let's hear what you have to say.....

comments

 
Copyright 2009 - 2012
Randomville.com ™
All Rights Reserved - Photos Licensed by PR Photos